The field of Eurocracy

Conference with Prof. Didier Georgakakis 6 May, 3:30 – 5:30pm, K2.31 Nash Lecture Theatre, 2nd Floor King’s Building, Strand Campus

The Research Centre for International Relations (RCIR) is delighted to host Prof. Georgakakis (Université Paris – la Sorbonne) who will deliver a talk on the field of Eurocracy. This event is organised in the framework of the EU-funded SOURCE project in which researchers of the RCIR are mapping the professions and institutions of security in Europe.

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RCIR reports: SOURCE Small seminar series on societal security, inequality, and development

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In March and April 2015, the SOURCE project team at KCL RCIR, led by Didier Bigo and Mederic Martin Mazé is convening a series of seminars to investigate the relations between societal security, international development and social policies from an international and European perspective. In these short pieces, Mederic briefly reports the debates and research expounded in the three seminars. Please note the third seminar in the series will be held on Thursday 2nd of april, all are welcome. Continue reading

Theory and Practice: The Ethics and Politics of Security

by Vivienne Jabri

I often come across the assertion that theorists, especially those working in ‘critical’ International Relations, are reluctant to engage with questions of policy. In other words, we might have a great deal to say about theory, concepts, and methods, and we might use these to critique particular policies and actions, but our language is so deep in the so-called ‘ivory tower’ that it tends to bypass the non-specialist, the policy-maker, or indeed the public sphere. The charge tends to be thrown at theorists generally, so one function we hope the Forum will serve is to show that theorists in International Relations have a great deal to say and to contribute to debates around the policy arena and wider issues that concern the public sphere.

Primarily, we would want to challenge the idea that ‘theory’ is somehow divorced from ‘practice’. I would want to argue that ‘practice’ is always imbued with a theoretical background that is often left hidden; as if the discourses and positions expressed in the area of policy are self-evident or can be taken for granted. Continue reading